26 September 2016

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MORNING LIGHT II, PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, 1982
MORNING LIGHT II, PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, 1982
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 53

Published Estimate: €30,000-50,000

Price Realised: €30000

  • Signature: signed with initials and dated [1/82] lower left; signed in English and Irish, titled, dated [1/1982] and numbered [R264 and 268] on reverse
  • Medium: acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 48 x 72in. (121.92 x 182.88cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now. . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1. The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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PAINTING, 1977
PAINTING, 1977
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 54

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €4000

  • Signature: signed, titled and dated [6/77] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board; window mounted with hand-painted canvas
  • Dimensions: 16½ x 17½in. (41.91 x 44.45cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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MORNING LIGHT, PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, 1980
MORNING LIGHT, PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, 1980
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 55

Published Estimate: €15,000-20,000

Price Realised: €26000

  • Signature: signed with initials lower left and dated lower right; signed in English and Irish, titled, dated [1/1980] and numbered [246 & R267] on reverse
  • Medium: acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 48 x 36in. (121.92 x 91.44cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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PINK NASSAU, 1977
PINK NASSAU, 1977
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 56

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €8000

  • Signature: signed with initials lower right; signed again, titled and dated [11/1977] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 14¼ x 18¼in. (36.20 x 46.36cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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THE NIGHT PAINTER, 1981
THE NIGHT PAINTER, 1981
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 57

Published Estimate: €12,000-15,000

Price Realised: €14000

  • Signature: signed in English and Irish, titled, dated [Sep 1981] and numbered [R252 & 281] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 48 x 24in. (121.92 x 60.96cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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THE GROVE STUDIO, 1983
THE GROVE STUDIO, 1983
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 58

Published Estimate: €8,000-10,000

Price Realised: €10000

  • Signature: with artist's initials in the weave lower left; titled on reverse
  • Medium: Gobelin style woven tapestry
  • Dimensions: 68 x 44½in. (172.72 x 113.03cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Around 1983 George McClelland approached Wexford weaver Terry Dunne to create five unique tapestries based on original artworks by Tony O'Malley from his collection. According to Dunne, these tapestries were originally intended for inclusion in the artist's Arts Council Retrospective in 1984 however this idea was never realised. Instead the artworks remained in the McClelland private collection unseen by the public until now. We are grateful to Terry Dunne for his kind assistance in cataloguing these works. Dunne continues his successful practice in County Wexford and has since produced commissioned pieces for O'Malley's wife Jane, Michael Smurfit & The K Club, Co. Kildare, Monaghan Cathedral, Dublin City University, Irish Life Beresford Place, Dublin and Green Isle Foods among others. For further reading see: www.terrytheweaver.ie Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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RED CELTIC, 1983
RED CELTIC, 1983
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 59

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €4000

  • Signature: with artist's initials in the weave lower left
  • Medium: Gobelin style woven tapestry
  • Dimensions: 36 x 25in. (91.44 x 63½cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Around 1983 George McClelland approached Wexford weaver Terry Dunne to create five unique tapestries based on original artworks by Tony O'Malley from his collection. According to Dunne, these tapestries were originally intended for inclusion in the artist's Arts Council Retrospective in 1984 however this idea was never realised. Instead the artworks remained in the McClelland private collection unseen by the public until now. We are grateful to Terry Dunne for his kind assistance in cataloguing these works. Dunne continues his successful practice in County Wexford and has since produced commissioned pieces for O'Malley's wife Jane, Michael Smurfit & The K Club, Co. Kildare, Monaghan Cathedral, Dublin City University, Irish Life Beresford Place, Dublin and Green Isle Foods among others. For further reading see: www.terrytheweaver.ie Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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OCTOBER AND BLACK, 1983
OCTOBER AND BLACK, 1983
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 60

Published Estimate: €5,000-7,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: with artist's initials in the weave lower left; titled on reverse
  • Medium: Gobelin style woven tapestry
  • Dimensions: 57 x 35in. (144.78 x 88.90cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Around 1983 George McClelland approached Wexford weaver Terry Dunne to create five unique tapestries based on original artworks by Tony O'Malley from his collection. According to Dunne, these tapestries were originally intended for inclusion in the artist's Arts Council Retrospective in 1984 however this idea was never realised. Instead the artworks remained in the McClelland private collection unseen by the public until now. We are grateful to Terry Dunne for his kind assistance in cataloguing these works. Dunne continues his successful practice in County Wexford and has since produced commissioned pieces for O'Malley's wife Jane, Michael Smurfit & The K Club, Co. Kildare, Monaghan Cathedral, Dublin City University, Irish Life Beresford Place, Dublin and Green Isle Foods among others. For further reading see: www.terrytheweaver.ie Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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ABSTRACT, 1979
ABSTRACT, 1979
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 61

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €2700

  • Signature: signed lower left; initialled and dated [7/79] lower right
  • Medium: gouache on paper
  • Dimensions: 15 x 20in. (38.10 x 50.80cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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STUDIO AND PAPMAN HEAD, 1979
STUDIO AND PAPMAN HEAD, 1979
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 62

Published Estimate: €6,000-8,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right; dated [11/79] right centre; titled lower left
  • Medium: gouache and pastel on card
  • Dimensions: 20¼ x 30½in. (51.44 x 77.47cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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CIRCULAR PAINTING, 1979
CIRCULAR PAINTING, 1979
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 63

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €2800

  • Signature: signed in Irish and English, titled and dated [4/79] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on chipboard; (circular)
  • Dimensions: 18½ x 18½in. (46.99 x 46.99cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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ABSTRACT, 1980
ABSTRACT, 1980
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 64

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1400

  • Signature: signed with initials and dated [7/80] lower left
  • Medium: gouache over watercolour and pencil
  • Dimensions: 9¾ x 13¾in. (24.77 x 34.93cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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NASSAU RED, 1980
NASSAU RED, 1980
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 65

Published Estimate: €6,000-8,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: initialled lower right; dated [3/80] lower left; signed, dated and titled upper right
  • Medium: gouache, pastel and watercolour on card
  • Dimensions: 20¼ x 30½in. (51.44 x 77.47cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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COTTAGES, ST MARTINS, 1972
COTTAGES, ST MARTINS, 1972
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 66

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €2100

  • Signature: signed with initials lower left; dated lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 15½ x 19in. (39.37 x 48.26cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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THE STILL, ENNISCORTHY, COUNTY WEXFORD, 1977
THE STILL, ENNISCORTHY, COUNTY WEXFORD, 1977
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 67

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €2300

  • Signature: inscribed [The Still, Enniscorthy, a memory], dated [9/1977] and initialled centre right; titled, dated and initialled along lower edge
  • Medium: gouache and pastel on paper
  • Dimensions: 20½ x 10¼in. (52.07 x 26.04cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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JERPOINT [ABBEY] COUNTY KILKENNY, 1977
JERPOINT [ABBEY] COUNTY KILKENNY, 1977
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 68

Published Estimate: €1,800-2,200

Price Realised: €2200

  • Signature: initialled lower left, titled lower centre and dated [7/77] lower right
  • Medium: gouache and pastel on paper
  • Dimensions: 10¼ x 20½in. (26.04 x 52.07cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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COMPOSITION, 1966
COMPOSITION, 1966
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 69

Published Estimate: €1,800-2,200

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed and dated [July] upper left; titled lower left; signed with initials and dated again lower right
  • Medium: gouache
  • Dimensions: 26 x 20¾in. (66.04 x 52.71cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 [ABSTRACTS]

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SAMHAIN 1977
SAMHAIN 1977
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 70

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1600

  • Signature: signed with initials and dated [31/10/1977] upper right; titled upper left; signed with initials and dated lower centre
  • Medium: gouache with collage on card
  • Dimensions: 20½ x 10¼in. (52.07 x 26.04cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 This translates as 'November'. [ABSTRACTS]

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PREACHÁN SAN OÍCHE 1980
PREACHÁN SAN OÍCHE 1980
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 71

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed with initials and dated lower right; titled lower left
  • Medium: gouache and charcoal on paper
  • Dimensions: 9½ x 13½in. (24.13 x 34.29cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Tony O'Malley's work came to the attention of art lovers in Ireland comparatively late in the artist's life. He spent the 1960s painting in Cornwall, absorbing the prevailing aesthetic of abstraction to his own ends. He did exhibit, but much work remained unsold. His creative harvest from the 1970s was magnificent. Marriage to Jane Harris in 1973 led to winters in the Bahamas, where he began painting outdoors on canvas. Sales however remained sporadic. O'Malley's life changed when Northern artists, F. E. Mc William and William Scott, introduced him to Belfast dealer, gallerist and collector, George McClelland in 1979 or 80. In the few but effective years during which he promoted O'Malley's work, George himself acquired a number of fine works. Some were loaned to the Irish Museum of Modern Art and later donated. (1) Others stayed in the family until now . In Cottage, St Martins, 1972 (lot 66) a figurative work, O'Malley explores the possibilities of French modernism. In Jerpoint, 1977 (lot 68) O'Malley's palette is strong and dark and his shapes highly stylised. This dynamic works well as a response to the Abbey's carved figures eroded over time. The energy of the contours suggests the vital imaginative presence to the artist of these figures from the past. The McClelland collection included some experimental works by O'Malley. The tactile quality of the wool in the tapestries communicates a different but interesting atmosphere to the paintings. October and Black, 1983 (lot 60), woven by Terry Dunne in Wexford, is in fact a very blue work, the intensity of the royal blue recalling stained glass. It attests to O'Malley's abiding interest in the medieval. The superb Night Painter, 1981 (lot 57) is in the tradition of the tall, rectangular works on board in which the artist explores the interior/exterior. Strong, irregular shapes provide the framework for the textured treatment of the surface. Verdigris greens billow around the predominant slate grey rectangle which signifies night. Incised marks reflect the resistance of the board and allow the paint to achieve a variety of effects. Abstracted in form, a small white curtain is tentatively anchored by a red spot. Perhaps there is a suggestion of a tiny self-portrait in one of the richly patterned, rhythmic panels below. Travelling to the Bahamas by plane made canvas the easiest support to manage. A sense of lightness and loveliness characterises Morning Light II, Paradise Island, Bahamas, 1982 (the present lot, 53) a painting at once abstract and based in the real world. In this serene and luminous work, the artist risks using the softest of colours; baby blue and pinks and lemony yellows. He characteristically divides the painting with a central linear spine, creating an open book or butterfly on the wing format. Space on the left is more recessive and still than on the right, where brushstrokes on the blue suggest a flurry of bird life. A feeling of reverence and joy is expressed. Intimate and reflective, many of these works by O'Malley from the Mc Clelland collection are of museum quality. Vera Ryan August 2016 1 The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004 This translates as 'Crow in the NIght'. [ABSTRACTS]

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SHEEP SKULL, GOAT SKULL, AFRICAN CARVING
SHEEP SKULL, GOAT SKULL, AFRICAN CARVING
Brian Bourke HRHA (b.1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 72

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €4000

  • Signature: signed and titled on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 39 x 39in. (99.06 x 99.06cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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HEAR NO EVIL, SPEAK NO EVIL
HEAR NO EVIL, SPEAK NO EVIL
Elizabeth Rivers (1903-1964)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 73

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1700

  • Signature: signed with initials
  • Medium: stone
  • Dimensions: 10½ x 7½ x 5in. (26.67 x 19.05 x 12.70cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.134 (illustrated)
  • "Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil plays on the tradition of two sided heads from ancient archaeological sites. In this piece she [Rivers] allows the marks of the chisel to form a pattern, reducing the realism of the two heads to create a stylised composition that draws on her [Rivers'] cubist training, but which may also reflect her knowledge of such double-headed figures as those on White Island in Fermanagh. The subject, like many of her book illustrations reaffirms traditional moral teachings and proverbs. This is especially true of Rivers' work after WWII, when she saw Ireland as a kind of Norah's Ark of security in the midst of European chaos."(1) (1) Catherine Marshall in The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.124 [SCULPTURE]

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SEAN
SEAN
Jerome Connor (1874-1943)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 74

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €2200

  • Signature: signed at base; titled on label beneath base
  • Medium: bronze on green marble base
  • Dimensions: 7½ x 4in. (19.05 x 10.16cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.139 (illustrated)
  • Dimensions of base: 5 by 3.5 by 3.5ins. Height inclusive of base: 12.5in. "One of the most powerful sculptures [in the McClelland Collection] is a small bronze portrait by the Kerry born artist Jerome Connor. The piece, Sean, is a portrait of one of the sculptor's favourite models when he worked in America, and has all the hallmarks of Connor's practice: an alert pose and the deliberate asymmetry that makes the likeness convincing. Connor's work [had] an added appeal for the McClellands as his homeplace, Annascaul, on the Dingle peninsula in Co. Kerry, is close to Maura McClelland's family home." (2) (2) Ibid., p.124 [SCULPTURE]

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SAINT BRIGID FEEDING THE POOR, c.1970
SAINT BRIGID FEEDING THE POOR, c.1970
Imogen Stuart RHA (b.1927)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 75

Published Estimate: €500-700

Price Realised: €1050

  • Signature
  • Medium: cast iron relief plaque
  • Dimensions: 9½ x 7½in. (24.13 x 19.05cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The present work is very similar in design to Stuart's commission for the opening of Saint Brigid's National School, Castleknock, Dublin and installed on their gable wall in 1970. A line drawing of this sculpture has been the school logo for the last number of years. [SCULPTURE]

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GRAIG NA MANACH
GRAIG NA MANACH
Eamonn O'Doherty (1939-2011)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 76

Published Estimate: €2,000-4,000

Price Realised: €5800

  • Signature
  • Medium: bronze
  • Dimensions: 27 x 15 x 8½in. (68.58 x 38.10 x 21.59cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Duiske Abbey is located on the River Barrow in Graiguenamanagh, Co. Kilkenny. [SCULPTURE]

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FOOTED BOWL, c.1980
FOOTED BOWL, c.1980
Dame Lucie Rie (Austrian/British 1902-1995)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 77

Published Estimate: €10,000-15,000

Price Realised: €30000

  • Signature: impressed with artist's initials at base
  • Medium: yellow glazed porcelain with manganese rim
  • Dimensions: 4½ x 6¾in. (11.43 x 17.15cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.146 (illustrated)
  • In the The Hunter Gatherer publication Henry Pim, lecturer in ceramics at Dublin's NCAD, wrote on the McClelland Ceramics and Glass collection and describes the present work thus: "One of my favourites in the collection is a beautiful ceramic bowl by Lucie Rie. Thrown on the potters' wheel, it is decorated with a pale yellow glaze and has a glossy bronze-coloured rim. Rie was something of a glaze wizard and developed wonderful surface treatments for her ceramics at a time when many potters took the view that pots should be brown. Arriving in London as a refugee from Austria at the start of the Second World War, Rie set up her studio there. She brought with her, a feeling for Modernism which made her work stand out in contrast to that of her English counterparts." (1) Rie studied pottery from 1922 under Michael Powolny at the Vienna Kunstgewerbeschule school of arts and crafts. Three years later she set up her first studio in Vienna in 1925 and exhibited the same year at the Paris International Exhibition. She won a silver medal at the Paris International Exhibition (the exhibition for which Pablo Picasso painted Guernica) in 1937. In 1938, she fled Austria and emigrated to England separated from her husband Hans Rie around this time. During the war and in subsequent years, she eked out a living making ceramic buttons and jewellery some of which are displayed at London's Victoria and Albert Museum along with the reconstruction of her entire 18 Albion Mews studio where she was based for 50 years. Rie taught at Camberwell College of Arts from 1960 until 1972. She ceased making pottery in 1990 after suffering a series of strokes and died in London aged 93. Her pottery is exhibited globally including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the York Art Gallery in the UK, and Paisley Museum in Scotland. (1) Henry Pim in The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.144 [SCULPTURE]

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PORCELAIN BOTTLE, c.1960
PORCELAIN BOTTLE, c.1960
Dame Lucie Rie (1902-1995)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 78

Published Estimate: €10,000-15,000

Price Realised: €20000

  • Signature: impressed with artist's initials at base
  • Medium: porcelain coated with manganese
  • Dimensions: 10 x 5in. (25.40 x 12.70cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • In the The Hunter Gatherer publication Henry Pim, lecturer in ceramics at Dublin's NCAD, wrote on the McClelland Ceramics and Glass collection and describes the present work thus: "One of my favourites in the collection is a beautiful ceramic bowl by Lucie Rie. Thrown on the potters' wheel, it is decorated with a pale yellow glaze and has a glossy bronze-coloured rim. Rie was something of a glaze wizard and developed wonderful surface treatments for her ceramics at a time when many potters took the view that pots should be brown. Arriving in London as a refugee from Austria at the start of the Second World War, Rie set up her studio there. She brought with her, a feeling for Modernism which made her work stand out in contrast to that of her English counterparts." (1) Rie studied pottery from 1922 under Michael Powolny at the Vienna Kunstgewerbeschule school of arts and crafts. Three years later she set up her first studio in Vienna in 1925 and exhibited the same year at the Paris International Exhibition. She won a silver medal at the Paris International Exhibition (the exhibition for which Pablo Picasso painted Guernica) in 1937. In 1938, she fled Austria and emigrated to England separated from her husband Hans Rie around this time. During the war and in subsequent years, she eked out a living making ceramic buttons and jewellery some of which are displayed at London's Victoria and Albert Museum along with the reconstruction of her entire 18 Albion Mews studio where she was based for 50 years. Rie taught at Camberwell College of Arts from 1960 until 1972. She ceased making pottery in 1990 after suffering a series of strokes and died in London aged 93. Her pottery is exhibited globally including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the York Art Gallery in the UK, and Paisley Museum in Scotland. (1) Henry Pim in The Hunter Gatherer - The Collection of George and Maura McClelland, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2004, p.144 [SCULPTURE]

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BOG LAKE WITH TURF STACK
BOG LAKE WITH TURF STACK
William Percy French (1854-1920)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 79

Published Estimate: €1,200-1,500

Price Realised: €1800


PORTRAIT OF AN ELDERLY LADY, c.1904-1905
PORTRAIT OF AN ELDERLY LADY, c.1904-1905
Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 80

Published Estimate: €10,000-15,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: charcoal
  • Dimensions: 21½ x 15in. (54.61 x 38.10cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Almost certainly drawn for the newspaper, To-day's 'Types' series which Henry worked on in 1904-5. In 1902 Ladbroke Black, a close friend of Henry's, left the Morning Leader and joined the weekly journal To-day as joint editor with Frank Rutter. Founded in 1893 by the novelist and playwright Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), To-day had a literary bias and therefore scope for original illustrations. Black gathered around him on the paper a number of friends, including Paul Henry, Robert Lynd and Walter Riddall, and so gradually the mantle of To-day was cast over them all. Paul Henry did illustrations, Lynd contributed essays, criticism and gossip, and Riddall wrote short sketches and book reviews. For his contributions Lynd was paid thirty shillings a week, so presumably Paul Henry earned a similar amount, an adequate wage by Edwardian standards. In the autumn of 1904 Henry began a series of illustrations called 'Types', for To-day. The Unfortunate, a drawing of an elderly pauper reading a paper by the Thames embankment at dusk first appeared on 5 October 1904, and was followed by The Grandmother (2 November), The Stick-Gatherer (9 November), The Ballad Singer (16 November), The Crank (23 November) and others. All of these drawings show Henry's debt to Whistler, his former teacher in Paris, and, indeed that he continued to admire Whistler is evident from his attendance at the latter's funeral on 23 July 1903. Henry's spell of full-time employment on To-day ended about 1905. This may have had something to do with Frank Rutter's leaving the paper to become art critic for the Sunday Times or, perhaps more likely, Paul simply grew tired of the repetitive routine, for throughout his life he disliked working to order. In any case he now began to work for a number of clients. Portrait of an Elderly Lady must date from about 1904-5, although its date of likely publication in To-day is not known. It is numbered 110A in S. B. Kennedy's ongoing cataloguing of Henry's oeuvre, and is similar in style to his Head of a Woman, also of c. 1904-5, reproduced in Kennedy, 2007, number 126, p. 125. Dr S.B. Kennedy August, 2016

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GIRL FEEDING CALVES
GIRL FEEDING CALVES
Walter Frederick Osborne RHA ROI (1859-1903)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 81

Published Estimate: €18,000-22,000

Price Realised: €17000

  • Signature
  • Medium: oil on canvas laid on board
  • Dimensions: 9½ x 13¾in. (24.13 x 34.93cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Mr & Mrs Oísín Kelly RHA (1916-1971); James Adam Salesroom, Dublin, December 1989, lot 111; Collection of Ian Stuart, sculptor (1926-2013); Whyte's, 26 April 2005, lot 105; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Walter Osborne's small painting of a girl feeding calves by hand has a simplicity and intimacy to it. Being the son of an animal painter, William Osborne, Walter had an affection for animals, both domestic and farm animals, and pets, and these, often in the company of children, featured in many paintings throughout his career, for example, in Grey Morning in a Breton Farmyard, 1883, where there is a calf with children, and Milking Time and its attendant pictures, set at Portmarnock. In Girl Feeding Calves, the figure and animals are shown in a small field or paddock, surrounded by tone walls and trees, indicated in blurred brushstrokes, to give a protective feel. The girl holds out a pan from which the calves feed. It is as if Osborne has come across this gentle scene, or glimpsed it from a window, and captured it swiftly in paint. He employs off-whites, warm browns and siennas, olives and yellow greens, in some places working over the colours or blurring the brushstrokes to capture the scene quickly. Dr. Julian Campbell August 2016

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LADIES ON A BEACH
George Russell ("Æ") (1867-1935)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 82

Published Estimate: €6,000-8,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed in monogram lower left
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 14 x 20in. (35.56 x 50.80cm)
  • Provenance: Gorry Gallery, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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CHILDREN AND WOMEN WITH PARASOLS
George Russell ("Æ") (1867-1935)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 83

Published Estimate: €5,000-7,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed with monogram lower right; with Victor Waddington Galleries label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 18 x 24in. (45.72 x 60.96cm)
  • Provenance: Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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WEST OF IRELAND FAIRY SCENE
WEST OF IRELAND FAIRY SCENE
Mícheál MacLíammóir (1899-1978)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 84

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €3800


IN POWDER AND CRINOLINE, FAIRY TALES RETOLD BY SIR ARTHUR QUILLER-COUCH
IN POWDER AND CRINOLINE, FAIRY TALES RETOLD BY SIR ARTHUR QUILLER-COUCH
Kay Rasmus Nielsen (Danish, 1886-1957)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 85

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €1000

  • Signature: signed by the artist and numbered [19] on editions page
  • Medium: first, limited edition book; (no. 19 from an edition of 500)
  • Dimensions
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Hodder and Stoughton, London, 1913. Quarto. Finely bound by The Chelsea Bindery in full dark green morocco, titles and decoration to spine gilt, raised bands, single rule to boards gilt, inner dentelles gilt, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt others untrimmed. A very good copy. With 26 mounted colour plates and captioned tissues. Signed limited edition of 500 copies, of which this is number 19. Accompanied by a copy of The Unknown Paintings of Kay Neilson, edited by David Larkin.

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LE TAURERGOT, 1949
LE TAURERGOT, 1949
Jean Lurçat (French, 1892-1966)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 86

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €9000

  • Signature: signed in the weave lower left
  • Medium: Aubusson tapestry; (from an edition of 2)
  • Dimensions: 71 x 56in. (180.34 x 142.24cm)
  • Provenance: Eric Pillon Enchères, Calais, France, 12 March 2000, lot 289 as 'Le Coq'; Private Collection deVeres, 3 March 2001, lot 149; Private Collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Jean Lurçat was one of the finest tapestry designers of his time and his innovations in the craft were widely practised in France. His influence on the work of Irish artist Louis le Brocquy - who was introduced to the medium in 1948 courtesy of the Edinburgh Tapestry Weavers - cannot be overstated. In 1949 Lurçat's Aubusson tapestry Jardin Des Coqs was included in the 1949 Irish Exhibition of Living Art in Dublin. Le Brocquy, writing for Ark Magazine Royal College of Art, London almost a decade later in 1956 describes Lurçat's work and its virtues thus: "Lurçat method of designing, already widely practised in France, has given new life to French tapestry, now more joyous and frank, more durable and economic than at any time since the end of the 16th century, when resistance to Renaissance idiom finally collapsed. His reconstituted technique imposes no particular style on the designer, as may be seen by comparing the quantity of stylistically varied work recently produced at Aubusson. It is essentially a return to medieval ways. In one form or another it represents the only practical and economic way of producing 'a very large work of woven and coloured wools': a tapestry. For any designer who has made a cartoon by this direct method of Lurçat and by the indirect, copy-a-painting method of, shall we say, Boucher, there can be no remaining doubt in eye or in mind as to the superiority of the former when comparing the two resultant tapestries. Only those can remain obdurate who insist on the virtue of cleverly and laboriously translating paint scumbles into weft". Accompanied by a copy of a letter to the prsent owner from the Musée Departemental de la Tapisserie, Aubusson. 'Le Taurergot' is a word invented by Lurçat and alludes to both the bull and the cock, two animals frequently depicted in his oeuvre. The Tabard workshop records mention of two versions of this work, both woven in 1949. The first sold in Sweden, the second is the present lot.

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FIGURES GATHERED c.1904-06
FIGURES GATHERED c.1904-06
Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 87

Published Estimate: €8,000-12,000

Price Realised: €17000

  • Signature: with Whatman Board [London] label on reverse; also with framing instructions in pencil verso
  • Medium: gouache and watercolour on card
  • Dimensions: 10½ x 14¼in. (26.67 x 36.20cm)
  • Provenance: Private Collection, Maryland, USA; Freeman's, Philadelphia, 14 June 2016, lot 95; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • This early Jack B. Yeats watercolour depicts a scene in the West of Ireland in which two groups of farmers exchange news and gossip. In the background horses and riders make their way along the horizon line, heading to a meeting or country fair. The tall elderly man in the great red coat dominates the image. A similar garment appears in Yeats' watercolour, Waiting c.1900 (Private Collection, illustrated in Hilary Pyle, Jack B. Yeats. His Watercolours, Drawings and Pastels, 1993, fig.13). The theme of figures hanging around before the day's market or race meeting began was a popular theme in Yeats' early work. A similar focus on men conversing is found in The Day of the Sports, 1904 (Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane). However, in Figures Gathering the sense of intimacy between the two figures on the left is prevented by the discrepancy in their stature. Yeats adds to this by showing the smaller man straining to make eye contact with his taller companion. By contrast the three farmers to their right stand shoulder to shoulder in deep conversation. The seniority of the old man is further suggested by his singular garb and by his straightened pose which set him apart from the other figures. Yeats was acutely conscious of the different social classes of the inhabitants of the West of Ireland, particularly after his visit to the Congested Districts Board with J. M. Synge in 1905. He subtly refers to this in this work. The strong red of the coat contrasts with the bright green of the grass on which the figures stand. These deep colours, and this combination in particular, is typical of the hues used by Yeats in his watercolour paintings of the early 1900s. They reveal his awareness of post-impressionist theories on colour as well as providing his contemporaries with a new and dramatic way of experiencing Irish life. Dr Róisín Kennedy August 2016

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AFTER THE BLITZ BELFAST
AFTER THE BLITZ BELFAST
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 88

Published Estimate: €12,000-15,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature
  • Medium: oil on canvas laid board
  • Dimensions: 12 x 15in. (30.48 x 38.10cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Gerard Dillon's paintings of war-torn Belfast were among those exhibited at his first exhibition held in Dublin and opened by Mainie Jellett at the Country Shop in St. Stephen's Green on 23 February 1942. James White describes how Jellett, "… recognised his possibilities. She instantly responded to his sincerity and intensity and his uncompromising manner of expressing his distaste for photographic representation."(1) In her opening address Jellett pointed out, "… what courage a young man required 'to launch out on a painting career at a time like this, with the forces of destruction rampant, whilst the forces of construction were struggling for life'. Among the works on this theme shown in Dublin were: Result of a Raid, Bombed Street and Blitzed Landscape. White continues, 'All of his pictures produced at this time reflect his gift of reportage, combined with his eye for significant shapes, both of people and places...'. (2) The Belfast Blitz comprised four attacks by the German Luftwaffe on strategic targets in the city in April and May 1941 during World War II. In the present example Dillon paints his emotional response to the destruction of the city seen in the crumbling red bricked walls, rubble and toppling electricity wire. The dark figures of the shawled women and the bleakness of the almost post-apocalyptic scene are highlighted by the inclusion of a small boy dressed in a red cap and coat holding his mother's hand. The green, white and orange (tricolour) painted against the exposed end wall in the top right of the composition provides the only other source of colour and is perhaps a nod to Dillon's Catholic Nationalist upbringing and the area of Belfast depicted. 1. White, James, Gerard Dillon, An Illustrated Biography, Wolfhound Press, Dublin, 1994, p.41 2. Ibid., p.41

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THE METRO, PARIS, 1931
THE METRO, PARIS, 1931
Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 89

Published Estimate: €15,000-20,000

Price Realised: €18000

  • Signature: signed lower right; signed, titled, dated and with artist's address [13 Stamer Street Dublin] on reverse; also with Apollo Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 24 x 29½in. (60.96 x 74.93cm)
  • Provenance: Adam's, 28 May 2003, lot 52; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Filled with bright vibrant colour, The Metro, Paris, evokes a leisurely sunny day spent in the French capital. In the foreground, two figures sip green and red liqueurs, while the face of a man in straw boater is concealed. Overhead, the fringe of the café's awning hangs down, with the word 'cognac' clearly legible. Beyond the café, tram tracks and overhead wires criss-cross the composition: in the distance a man alights from the Line 5, and a larger, red metro moves across the metal aerial track. To the right of the composition, an Art Nouveau-style entrance can be seen, with the name Jean Jaurès visible in red lettering. Elsewhere, the composition is populated with characters typical of Kernoff's urban scenes, such as the woman walking purposefully with a fresh baguette under her arm, or the poodle, complete with an elaborate red bow. Kernoff had first visited Paris in 1923, using part of his £50 scholarship from the Taylor Bequest Awards to fund a trip abroad. However, it seems likely that he visited the city again in 1931: a pencil sketch in the National Gallery of Ireland is signed and dated July 1931, and in 1932, he exhibited six Parisian watercolours at The Gallery, 7 Stephen's Green. This collection included Canal, Jean-Jaurès, Paris, 1931 (Whyte's, 28 November 2011). (1) 1931 was an auspicious year for the artist: a large painting, Jupiter and the Muses, was accepted to the Royal Academy, London, and received press coverage in Ireland and Paris. (2) In March of the same year, the artist's first solo exhibition in London had taken place at the Gieves Gallery, Old Bond Street. At the 1932 Dublin exhibition, and at a further London show in 1938, Kernoff exhibited a work titled The Metro, Jean Jaurès, however the low catalogue prices suggest that these were smaller watercolour paintings. (3) A work titled Metro, Paris 1931 was also exhibited at the Harry Kernoff Memorial Exhibition at Municipal Gallery (now the Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane) in 1976-77, listed as a watercolour measuring 11.4 by 16 inches. (4) It was not unusual for the artist to complete multiple versions of the same composition, in different media, and so it is possible that a watercolour version of this painting is extant. In 1957, Kernoff exhibited a work of the same title priced at £65, suggesting a larger painting in oils - such as the present work. The style and execution of The Metro, Paris is redolent of other works from the 1930s - particularly the economical use of paint - and is a characteristic example of his work. Dr Kathryn Milligan ESB Fellow ESB Centre for the Study of Irish Art National Gallery of Ireland August 2016 1. Harry Kernoff, Exhibition of Pictures, The Gallery, 7 Stephen's Green, 2 - 14 May, 1932. 2. Articles were published in several French art magazines, see Harry Kernoff Papers, National Library of Ireland, Ms. 20, 928. 3. See footnote 1 above, and Harry Kernoff, RHA, The White Gallery, London, 28 April - 12 May 1938. 4. The Harry Kernoff Memorial Exhibition, the Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, 14 December 1976 - 30 January 1977.

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A COUNTY MAYO LAKE
A COUNTY MAYO LAKE
Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 90

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €1900


PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN WITH HAZEL EYES, 1923
PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN WITH HAZEL EYES, 1923
Patrick Joseph Tuohy (1894-1930)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 91

Published Estimate: €2,500-3,500

Price Realised: €2800


TURF TO MEND THE FIRE
TURF TO MEND THE FIRE
Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 92

Published Estimate: €12,000-15,000

Price Realised: €12500

  • Signature: signed and with dedication on reverse; signed by artist and artist's second wife [Mabel Henry née Young] on typed exhibition label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 5¾ x 4¾in. (14.61 x 12.07cm)
  • Provenance: Private Collection, USA
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: Kennedy, Dr S.B., Paul Henry: Paintings, Drawings and Illustrations, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2007, no. 319, p. 159
  • Until now, the whereabouts of this work had been "untraced or unidentified" by Dr. S.B. Kennedy who lists the example in his text on Henry p.159

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ILLUSTRATION FOR THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD, ACT 1, 'RISING UP IN THE RED DAWN...'
ILLUSTRATION FOR THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD, ACT 1, 'RISING UP IN THE RED DAWN...'
Seán Keating PRHA HRA HRSA (1889-1977)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 93

Published Estimate: €14,000-20,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed in Irish lower right; signed again and dated Aibrean [April] 1922 on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 30 x 25in. (76.20 x 63½cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired at the Dawson Gallery, Dublin, early 1950s; Thence by family descent to the previous owner; Whyte's, 30 April 2007, lot 90; Private collection; Whyte's, 30 May 2011, lot 37; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: Synge, J.M., The Playboy of the Western World, George Allen and Unwin, London, 1927
  • Seán Keating has become synonymous with the west of Ireland in general, and with the Aran Islands in particular. His association with the western seaboard began as early as 1913 and was further emphasised through a series of self-portraits for which the artist dressed in Aran clothing. There is no evidence that Keating ever met John Millington Synge, but in 1917 the artist exhibited a painting in the RHA titled The Outlandish Lovers, which was inspired by The Playboy of the Western World. Synge's nephew, known as 'Hutchie', approached Keating in 1922 with a commission to paint twelve illustrations for a proposed deluxe volume of The Playboy of the Western World. In the event, ten of the twelve images were published. Sir John Lavery was called upon to inspect the first four illustrations. Lavery was greatly impressed by the realism, colour and artistic invention in the work, and he considered them of great importance to the craft of book illustration in Ireland at that time. The full set of paintings was to have been ready in 1926, but a delay on Keating's part meant that the book was finally published as a numbered series of one thousand copies in 1927. The publication has since become a collectors' item. It was an important and prestigious commission, and Keating took his role as an illustrator of Synge's work very seriously. As if to expand on Synge's story, Keating chose scenes from the play that, for the most part, are not seen on stage. Perhaps most interesting of all is that Keating himself makes an appearance in the images as Christy Mahon's father. Proving his commitment to the commission, the artist even posed entirely nude for the scene in which Christy's father apparently awakes from the 'dead' (lot 93). It is the only instance of a nude portrait of the artist in his entire career. In order to plan the compositions in great detail Keating undertook a series of photographs using models from the school of art. He may also have taken sketches at the theatre because many of the actors of the day appear in the illustrations. Sara Allgood, sister of Molly for whom the role was originally written, appeared as Pegeen Mike in a production of The Playboy of the Western World staged in 1924. The features of the female model wrapping bandages around Christie's head are very similar to Sara's, but in this instance she is now the Widow Quin. Barry Fitzgerald and F. J. McCormack, who took part in that same production in 1924, also make an appearance in Keating's illustrations as 'the hairy gallant fellows'. From 1926 until circa 1936 the role of Pegeen Mike was played by Eileen Crowe, who makes an appearance in Keating's work in the guise of 'Helen of Troy', while a cast of likely-looking prophets, or Abbey actors, appear behind 'the bars of paradise' in order to get a look at her. The artist makes another appearance as the figure to the left of the group of prophets. Once the publishers had reproduced the images to the required scale, the original paintings were returned to the artist who exhibited them in various venues in the late 1920s. They are an unusual, witty and yet contextually important series of works that signal the nature and extent of the interconnection between the visual arts and literature in the early years of the Irish Free State. Dr Éimear O'Connor HRHA Author of Seán Keating: Art, Politics and Building the Irish Nation (Kildare: Irish Academic Press, 2013)

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ILLUSTRATION FOR THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD - 'HELEN AND THE HOLY PROPHETS'
ILLUSTRATION FOR THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD - 'HELEN AND THE HOLY PROPHETS'
Seán Keating PRHA HRA HRSA (1889-1977)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 94

Published Estimate: €18,500-30,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right; numbered [5] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on panel
  • Dimensions: 36 x 29½in. (91.44 x 74.93cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired at the Dawson Gallery, Dublin, early 1950s; Thence by family descent to the previous owner; Whyte's, 30 April 2007, lot 90; Private collection; Whyte's, 30 May 2011, lot 35; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: Synge, J.M., The Playboy of the Western World, George Allen and Unwin, London, 1927
  • Seán Keating has become synonymous with the west of Ireland in general, and with the Aran Islands in particular. His association with the western seaboard began as early as 1913 and was further emphasised through a series of self-portraits for which the artist dressed in Aran clothing. There is no evidence that Keating ever met John Millington Synge, but in 1917 the artist exhibited a painting in the RHA titled The Outlandish Lovers, which was inspired by The Playboy of the Western World. Synge's nephew, known as 'Hutchie', approached Keating in 1922 with a commission to paint twelve illustrations for a proposed deluxe volume of The Playboy of the Western World. In the event, ten of the twelve images were published. Sir John Lavery was called upon to inspect the first four illustrations. Lavery was greatly impressed by the realism, colour and artistic invention in the work, and he considered them of great importance to the craft of book illustration in Ireland at that time. The full set of paintings was to have been ready in 1926, but a delay on Keating's part meant that the book was finally published as a numbered series of one thousand copies in 1927. The publication has since become a collectors' item. It was an important and prestigious commission, and Keating took his role as an illustrator of Synge's work very seriously. As if to expand on Synge's story, Keating chose scenes from the play that, for the most part, are not seen on stage. Perhaps most interesting of all is that Keating himself makes an appearance in the images as Christy Mahon's father. Proving his commitment to the commission, the artist even posed entirely nude for the scene in which Christy's father apparently awakes from the 'dead.' It is the only instance of a nude portrait of the artist in his entire career. In order to plan the compositions in great detail Keating undertook a series of photographs using models from the school of art. He may also have taken sketches at the theatre because many of the actors of the day appear in the illustrations. Sara Allgood, sister of Molly for whom the role was originally written, appeared as Pegeen Mike in a production of The Playboy of the Western World staged in 1924. The features of the female model wrapping bandages around Christie's head are very similar to Sara's, but in this instance she is now the Widow Quin. Barry Fitzgerald and F. J. McCormack, who took part in that same production in 1924, also make an appearance in Keating's illustrations as 'the hairy gallant fellows'. From 1926 until circa 1936 the role of Pegeen Mike was played by Eileen Crowe, who makes an appearance in Keating's work in the guise of 'Helen of Troy', while a cast of likely-looking prophets, or Abbey actors, appear behind 'the bars of paradise' in order to get a look at her (lot 94). The artist makes another appearance as the figure to the left of the group of prophets. Once the publishers had reproduced the images to the required scale, the original paintings were returned to the artist who exhibited them in various venues in the late 1920s. They are an unusual, witty and yet contextually important series of works that signal the nature and extent of the interconnection between the visual arts and literature in the early years of the Irish Free State. Dr Éimear O'Connor HRHA Author of Seán Keating: Art, Politics and Building the Irish Nation (Kildare: Irish Academic Press, 2013)

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SINGING 'UNDER THE CANOPY OF HEAVEN', 1950
SINGING 'UNDER THE CANOPY OF HEAVEN', 1950
Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 95

Published Estimate: €90,000-120,000

Price Realised: €85000

  • Signature: signed lower right; titled on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 9 x 14in. (22.86 x 35.56cm)
  • Provenance: Victor Waddington Galleries, 1953; Collection of John Devine; Private collection, 1968; Private collection, Ireland, 1971; deVeres, 27 September 2005, lot 31; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: Pyle, Hilary, Jack B. Yeats: A Catalogue Raisonné of the Oil Paintings, Andre Deutsh, London, 1992, Vol. I, page 968, catalogue no. 1066; also Vol. III (black and white illustration, p. 541)
  • Many of Yeats' late paintings focus on strolling players and performers winding their way through the Irish countryside, providing entertainment and amusement to those around them. Such works include key paintings like The Entertainers (1945, Private Collection), Left-Left, We Left our Name On the Road, On the Road, (1948, Private Collection) and The Singing Horseman, (National Gallery of Ireland, 1949). Singing 'Under the Canopy of Heaven' explores a similar theme. Two figures, seen only from the mid torso upwards, move through a bare landscape, their mouths open in song. One figure wears a bowler hat pulled down over his ears in a comical fashion. His companion holds a large banner. They are painted in an almost transparent manner that makes them connect intimately with their surroundings. The blue of the sky and the green of the fields are visible through their skin. The title of the painting suggests the feeling of freedom and close connection to nature. The phrase 'Under the Canopy of Heaven' has a distinctly religious connotation. It evokes a Christian idea of God's bounty in providing humanity with a world of natural beauty. It is used in the title of a number of 18th and 19th century paintings of vagrants or gypsies living in the open countryside. It is also the title of a 19th century American hymn. Singing 'Under the Canopy of Heaven' is probably based on the artist's memory of a political or religious parade or march such as those which took place in Sligo and the border counties. Yeats would have been drawn to these events not so much by politics, as by his fascination with masquerade and performance. Standing back from the work a strong sense of perspective emerges. Only the head and shoulders of the men are depicted. The viewpoint is like that of a close-up shot rather than a conventional fine art perspective. It is as if the viewer were standing right beside the marchers. The right-hand figure appears to be positioned closest to the surface of the painting while the banner he is carrying is painted to appear blurred and out of focus. The second figure appears much more diminutive which reinforces the sense of his distance from the viewer. This dramatic perspective adds to the dynamic movement of the group and the energy imparted by the men as they devote themselves to their marching song. Dr Róisín Kennedy August 2016

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STEPS OF THE COURS
STEPS OF THE COURS
William John Leech RHA ROI (1881-1968)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 96

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €5000

  • Signature: signed and numbered [2] on reverse; with stamp of 'Librairie / Meynier' [L. Rontani, Succ' / 5 Rue du Palais, 5 & 2, Rue de l'Hôtel de Ville, Nice]; also with a letter relating to the provenance on reverse
  • Medium: oil on panel
  • Dimensions: 9½ x 7¼in. (24.13 x 18.42cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The letter affixed to the back of this work was sent from Paddington, 23 March 1988, to Dublin, Éire, recipient blacked out. This letter describes how the author's father had worked in Percy Botterell's firm of solicitors in London, and that his aunt had been the nanny to May and Percy Botterell's three children, Jim, Guy and Suzanne and then nanny to Jim and Eileen Botterell's two daughters, Gillian and Bridget, in Burnley, the New Forest and then housekeeper to Percy Botterell in Burnley. The present work, Steps of the Cours, was probably given as a present to the nanny of the Botterell children who gave it to the author of the letter who in turn gave it to D & W, the recipients of the letter. After Leech had painted May Botterell's portrait in 1919, the couple formed a lasting lifetime attachment and the trips that they made together to France for Leech to paint the landscape, was to the area in the South of France, above Nice, in the hillside town of St. Jeannet. Here Leech rented a house for seven years but afterwards he and May continued to visit the area, staying in Cagnes-sur-mer and then in Grasse where he painted Steps of the Cours, Grasse. Leech painted several studies of these steps, which were topped by an urn on a pillar and one of these works he exhibited in the RHA exhibition in 1930. He also exhibited a work in 1932 Steps of the Cours, Grasse, in Derby City Council exhibition, sent from his studio at Hamilton Mews, London, NW8. Perhaps the same work was exhibited in Leech's first solo exhibition at the Dawson Gallery in 1945. Another work, Steps to the Cours (p.78, Ferran, illustrated) was purchased by Mrs E.Murray Fuller, a Wellington art Dealer and exhibited at the Canterbury Society of Arts in May 1936. This work is a freely painted section of the steps to the Cours with focus only on the urn, on top of the pillar but it is painted in the harmonious pastel palette Leech used for this subject matter. It is also painted on the size of small board which Leech used when painting en plein air and which fitted into his carrying box. These quick studies were frequently used to supply Leech with the necessary detail he needed to complete larger works in his studio. Dr Denise Ferran August 2016

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COASTAL TOWN BY MOONLIGHT, 1962
COASTAL TOWN BY MOONLIGHT, 1962
Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 97

Published Estimate: €8,000-12,000

Price Realised: €7500

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right; with newspaper clipping of artist's obituary affixed on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 20 x 28in. (50.80 x 71.12cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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FIGURE IN A LANDSCAPE
FIGURE IN A LANDSCAPE
Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 98

Published Estimate: €30,000-40,000

Price Realised: €45000

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 15¾ x 21¾in. (40.01 x 55¼cm)
  • Provenance: de Veres, 30 November 2005, lot 15; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Women and landscapes dominate in the oeuvre of Daniel O'Neill and the present example typifies the artist's expressionistic style and deeply personal reading of the Irish landscape. The mood and colouring would suggest it falls into O'Neill's later body of work characterised by a more vibrant palette, a controlled technique and simpler motifs. The foreground shows his expert use of the palette knife and creates a deliciously textured surface which contrasts with the sleek waters in the middle distance and the temperamental skies above. The light, emanating from an unspecified source, lifts the mood of the work and casts interesting shadows against the figure and her environment. An injection of colour in the yellow of her blouse is picked up in warm tones of the soil beneath her and in the sandy shore to the left of the composition. Flickers of yellow and subtle pinks also bring warmth to the scene in the delicate clouds above this statuesque figure. She is O'Neill's archetypal stoic female wearing what artist and art critic T.P. Flanagan once described as "those timeless garments the painter created for his characters" and her Mona Lisa-esque smile adds O'Neill's ubiquitous element of mystery to the painting. The uniqueness of Daniel O'Neill's style can be attributed to his lack of formal training. He did attend evening classes at the Belfast College of Art and he worked for a time in the studio of Sidney Smith but he was largely self-taught and could not dedicate himself to painting fulltime until Victor Waddington offered him a gallery contract in 1945. His first solo show was with Waddington the following year.

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LE JEU DE LA LUNE, 1952
LE JEU DE LA LUNE, 1952
Basil Ivan Rákóczi (1908-1979)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 99

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,500

Price Realised: €2600

  • Signature: signed lower right; titled, numbered [1750] and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 22 x 15in. (55.88 x 38.10cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • With a second work on reverse. This oil was painted by Basil Rákóczi in April 1952 in Menton, on one of his many stays on the south coast of France in the late 1940s and into the 1950s. The title refers to the mythical creatures, part human and part beast, cavorting or playing to the light of the moon. These creatures, with their trademark square heads, were first referred to by the artist as 'wooks', or 'wookies'. He later called them his lantern figures, reflecting their other-worldly, or ghost-like, nature. We are grateful to the artist's family for their assistance in cataloguing this work. [ABSTRACTS]

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BOY WITH PAINTING OF SWAN
BOY WITH PAINTING OF SWAN
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 100

Published Estimate: €8,000-12,000

Price Realised: €8000


GROWTHS, 1961
GROWTHS, 1961
Basil Ivan Rákóczi (1908-1979)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 101

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed, titled, dated and numbered [2935] on reverse; also inscribed [To John McGowan from his staff at NATO on leaving, 1962]
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 28½ x 36in. (72.39 x 91.44cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • [ABSTRACTS]

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SHAWLIES, COTTAGES AND TREE BEFORE A MOUNTAIN
SHAWLIES, COTTAGES AND TREE BEFORE A MOUNTAIN
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 26 September 2016 / 102

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €4600

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 12 x 20in. (30.48 x 50.80cm)
  • Provenance: Kenneth Webb Collection, Kelly’s Hotel, Rosslare Strand, Co. Wexford & Dolan's, 5 May 2014; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • [ABSTRACTS]

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