27 November 2017

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PAINTING NO. XL, 1953
PAINTING NO. XL, 1953
Thurloe Conolly (b.1918)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 53

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed, titled and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil and mixed media on board
  • Dimensions: 30 x 40in. (76.20 x 101.60cm)
  • Provenance: Victor Waddington Gallery, Dublin; Gimpel Fils, London; Private collection; Whyte's, 9 October 2001, lot 143; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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BRONZE ABSTRACT
BRONZE ABSTRACT
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 54

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: titled on reverse
  • Medium: oil and sand on canvas
  • Dimensions: 21 x 29in. (53.34 x 73.66cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Jim O'Driscoll SC; Thence by descent
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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PLANES AND RECESSIONS
PLANES AND RECESSIONS
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 55

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1400

  • Signature: signed lower centre; titled on reverse
  • Medium: oil and sand on board
  • Dimensions: 30 x 20in. (76.20 x 50.80cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Jim O'Driscoll SC; Thence by descent
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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AUTUMN [DUBLIN] 1963
AUTUMN [DUBLIN] 1963
Eric Patton RHA (1925-2004)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 56

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €950

  • Signature: signed lower left; titled on Ritchie Hendriks Gallery label on reverse; also with artist's name, title and number inscribed on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 35 x 47in. (88.90 x 119.38cm)
  • Provenance: Ritchie Hendriks Gallery, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The present work was one of the three most expensive works in the Hendriks Gallery solo show in 1963 and was priced 100gns.

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STILL LIFE THEME, 1963
STILL LIFE THEME, 1963
Arthur Armstrong RHA (1924-1996)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 58

Published Estimate: €3,000-4,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left; titled on Ritchie Hendriks Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 25½ x 36in. (64.77 x 91.44cm)
  • Provenance: Ritchie Hendriks Gallery, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Presented in original Ritchie Hendriks frame. For another work by Armstrong exhibited in the same Hendriks solo show in 1963 see lot 44, Ochre Vase, 1963.

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WAGON AND MOONLIGHT, 1955
WAGON AND MOONLIGHT, 1955
Kenneth Mahood (b.1930)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 59

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €1700

  • Signature: signed lower right; with title and dated on reverse; with Frederick Gallery exhibition label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 12 x 20in. (30.48 x 50.80cm)
  • Provenance: Frederick Gallery, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The Frederick Gallery exhibition catalogue accompanies this lot. Kenneth Mahood was born in Belfast in 1930. From 1945 to 1949 he was an apprentice lithographer before becoming a professional painter. He exhibited in Belfast, London and Dublin and won a CEMA scholarship to study art in Paris. In 1955 Victor Waddington held a solo show of his work and in 1956 in London he exhibited in a two-man show with Jack B. Yeats. His first cartoon was accepted by Punch when he was eighteen, and he later became not only a regular contributor but also, from 1960 to 1965, the magazine's Assistant Art Editor under William Hewison. In 1966 Mahood became the first-ever political cartoonist on The Times, and in the same year was a founder member of the British Cartoonists' Association. He left The Times at the end of 1968, but at the start of 1969 began working as a cartoonist for the Evening Standard. In 1971 he went to the Financial Times. In 1978 he was elected to the Punch Table, and in 1982 he moved to the Daily Mail to draw its "Compact Cartoon". Mahood has also contributed drawings to the New Yorker, produced a number of books and worked in collage.

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GREEN LANDSCAPE
GREEN LANDSCAPE
Kenneth Mahood (b.1930)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 60

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €950

  • Signature: signed lower right; titled on original label preserved on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 13 x 23½in. (33.02 x 59.69cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Kenneth Mahood was born in Belfast in 1930. From 1945 to 1949 he was an apprentice lithographer before becoming a professional painter. He exhibited in Belfast, London and Dublin and won a CEMA scholarship to study art in Paris. In 1955 Victor Waddington held a solo show of his work and in 1956 in London he exhibited in a two-man show with Jack B. Yeats. His first cartoon was accepted by Punch when he was eighteen, and he later became not only a regular contributor but also, from 1960 to 1965, the magazine's Assistant Art Editor under William Hewison. In 1966 Mahood became the first-ever political cartoonist on The Times, and in the same year was a founder member of the British Cartoonists' Association. He left The Times at the end of 1968, but at the start of 1969 began working as a cartoonist for the Evening Standard. In 1971 he went to the Financial Times. In 1978 he was elected to the Punch Table, and in 1982 he moved to the Daily Mail to draw its "Compact Cartoon". Mahood has also contributed drawings to the New Yorker, produced a number of books and worked in collage.

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HARBOUR, RED AND YELLOW
HARBOUR, RED AND YELLOW
Kenneth Mahood (b.1930)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 61

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €950

  • Signature: with original Waddington Galleries exhibition label on reverse; also with Frederick Gallery exhibition label on reverse
  • Medium: oil and mixed media on board
  • Dimensions: 8 x 23½in. (20.32 x 59.69cm)
  • Provenance: Waddington Galleries, London; Where purchased by a Mr Patrick Hall Esq.; with Frederick Gallery, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Kenneth Mahood was born in Belfast in 1930. From 1945 to 1949 he was an apprentice lithographer before becoming a professional painter. He exhibited in Belfast, London and Dublin and won a CEMA scholarship to study art in Paris. In 1955 Victor Waddington held a solo show of his work and in 1956 in London he exhibited in a two-man show with Jack B. Yeats. His first cartoon was accepted by Punch when he was eighteen, and he later became not only a regular contributor but also, from 1960 to 1965, the magazine's Assistant Art Editor under William Hewison. In 1966 Mahood became the first-ever political cartoonist on The Times, and in the same year was a founder member of the British Cartoonists' Association. He left The Times at the end of 1968, but at the start of 1969 began working as a cartoonist for the Evening Standard. In 1971 he went to the Financial Times. In 1978 he was elected to the Punch Table, and in 1982 he moved to the Daily Mail to draw its "Compact Cartoon". Mahood has also contributed drawings to the New Yorker, produced a number of books and worked in collage.

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UNTITLED [ABSTRACT LANDSCAPE]
UNTITLED [ABSTRACT LANDSCAPE]
Kenneth Mahood (b.1930)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 62

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left; with provenance details in a later hand on reverse
  • Medium: oil and mixed media on paper
  • Dimensions: 10½ x 18¾in. (26.67 x 47.63cm)
  • Provenance: C.E.M.A. Gallery, Belfast;Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Kenneth Mahood was born in Belfast in 1930. From 1945 to 1949 he was an apprentice lithographer before becoming a professional painter. He exhibited in Belfast, London and Dublin and won a CEMA scholarship to study art in Paris. In 1955 Victor Waddington held a solo show of his work and in 1956 in London he exhibited in a two-man show with Jack B. Yeats. His first cartoon was accepted by Punch when he was eighteen, and he later became not only a regular contributor but also, from 1960 to 1965, the magazine's Assistant Art Editor under William Hewison. In 1966 Mahood became the first-ever political cartoonist on The Times, and in the same year was a founder member of the British Cartoonists' Association. He left The Times at the end of 1968, but at the start of 1969 began working as a cartoonist for the Evening Standard. In 1971 he went to the Financial Times. In 1978 he was elected to the Punch Table, and in 1982 he moved to the Daily Mail to draw its "Compact Cartoon". Mahood has also contributed drawings to the New Yorker, produced a number of books and worked in collage.

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TALL FIGURE, 1965
TALL FIGURE, 1965
Melanie le Brocquy HRHA (b.1919)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 63

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed with initials and numbered on base; with typed label beneath base
  • Medium: bronze; (no. 6 from an edition of 6)
  • Dimensions: 13½ x 2¼in. (34.29 x 5.72cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: 'Melanie le Brocquy', RHA, Dublin and The Arts Council, Dublin, 1999, p.16 (illustrated) and p.8 (illustrated); respectively
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HEAD OF CHILD, 1988
HEAD OF CHILD, 1988
Melanie le Brocquy HRHA (b.1919)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 64

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed with initials and numbered; with typed label beneath base
  • Medium: bronze; (no. 6 from an edition of 6)
  • Dimensions: 7½ x 6½in. (19.05 x 16.51cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: 'Melanie le Brocquy', RHA, Dublin and The Arts Council, Dublin, 1999, p.16 (illustrated) and p.8 (illustrated); respectively
  • The artist's file in NIVAL, Dublin records a plaster of Paris example of Head of Child dated 1942 and includes a photograph of the artist with her brother, Louis le Brocquy, at their joint exhibition in Merrion Row, Dublin in December of that year.

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TWO AMAZONS
TWO AMAZONS
Olivia Musgrave (b.1958)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 65

Published Estimate: €3,000-4,000

Price Realised: €4400

  • Signature: signed and editioned on base; with RHA exhibition label beneath base
  • Medium: bronze on wooden base; (no. 1 from an edition of 9)
  • Dimensions: 16 x 23½ x 6in. (40.64 x 59.69 x 15.24cm)
  • Provenance: RHA, Dublin; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Although born in Dublin, Olivia Musgrave studied and lived in both Paris and Italy before attending the City and Guilds of London Institute to study sculpture under Allan Sly. Her work is reminiscent of Greek mythology and takes inspiration from the Italian sculptor, Marino Marini 1901-1980, among others. Her work has been shown with the John Martin Gallery, London and Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin as well as in South Africa and the USA. She is a member of the Royal Society of British Sculptors and the Society of Portrait Sculptors. In 2014 she was elected President of the Society of Portrait Sculptors. In 2004 Musgrave married John Gardiner, Baron Gardiner of Kimble, a Conservative life peer and member of the House of Lords.

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PEONY, 1991
PEONY, 1991
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 66

Published Estimate: €35,000-45,000

Price Realised: €47000

  • Signature: signed, titled, dated and with artist's archival number [588] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 10 x 12in. (25.40 x 30.48cm)
  • Provenance: Hillsboro Fine Art, Dublin, where purchased by the present owner, circa1997
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Presented in the original frame chosen by the artist's wife, Anne Madden. A letter from the artist to the present owner accompanies this lot. "…I feel very humble on receiving your wonderful letter…, for it is rare for an artist to be given to feel that his occasional glimpses of spiritual insight have somehow managed to move another person. Thank you. In fact your painting was inspired by a small work by Édouard Manet [French Realist and Impressionist painter, 1832-1883] which I believe I first saw at The Orangerie in the Paris of 1938! Yes, the frame was something of a challenge in itself and in painting your Peony I certainly had it in mind. A second related painting I gave my wife, Anne Madden in memory of her peony which had last bloomed during the previous summer…" Louis le Brocquy Les Combes, Carros, France 23 January 2000 Most le Brocquy paintings are palimpsests, one layer folds over another and provide different vantage points from which to view. As the title suggests this is a peony. Such flowers thrive around the Mediterranean in springtime or early summer, ranging in colour from deep purple to pure white. Mythologically, they are named for Paeon, student of Asclepius, Greek God of healing. The master became jealous of his protégé, who, for his own safety, was turned by Zeus into a flower. In Asia the Peony is valued more for the healing properties of its seeds than the beauty of its appearance. Everything depends upon the eye of the beholder. le Brocquy's wife, Anne, an illustrious painter in her own right, had grown this peony in her garden. It was the last of them. He painted it in homage to her. And so, at another level again, this peony is transfused with love. A delicate eroticism pervades its fragrance comparable to his later 1998 series of watercolours titled 'Being,' where the human body is an organism in flower. At the painterly level, Peony was sparked by a viewing, half a century previously, of Édouard Manet, who supposedly invented 'Modernity,' at the Orangerie in Paris in 1938. Manet grew peonies in his garden at Gennevilliers. It was his favourite flower. Those deep lobes and varied hues corresponded to his subtle harmonics. But Manet was his own man where convention and tradition were concerned. Modernity for him was as much a question of choosing as resisting influences from the past: he painted as things were and without much concern for established practice of brushstroke or perspective. In his wake, this is a le Brocquy as much as it is a Peony. Finally, the painting reveals a world through the petals of a flower. As Empress Michiko of Japan would say to the artist in January of the year after the painting was completed: 'I think you are trying to reach something behind and beyond, which goes to the essence.' This Peony brings in its train a swarming teeming underground metropolis. Dom Mark Patrick Hederman, OSB October 2017 Former Abbot of Glenstal Abbey, Co. Limerick, Hederman was among those Louis le Brocquy choose to speak at his funeral service at St. Patrick's Cathedral in 2012.

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HORSES EXERCISING
HORSES EXERCISING
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 68

Published Estimate: €30,000-40,000

Price Realised: €32000

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 18 x 24in. (45.72 x 60.96cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Blackshaw's English father who was a horse and dog trainer as well as being an amateur watercolourist, moved to Northern Ireland and brought up his large close-knit family in County Down amongst a circle which consisted of farmers, dealers, horsey people, local squires, and even artists. 'I was riding when I was three or four years old and was soon hunting' (4). By the age of ten he was earning pocket money painting the horses of neighbouring farmers and he even funded his art-college stint by doing such work. As an adult he bred both horses and dogs as well as training them. As any countryman will immediately recognise, Blackshaw's paintings of animals are not those of a townie but rather those of a man who has had an intimate, lifelong knowledge of the animal world. Yes, he learnt from Stubbs, and especially from the early Munnings, and yes, he learnt how to strip back a subject to its essence from Giacometti, but he was rarely interested in the detailed articulation of muscle and sinew: 'I want to be divorced a bit from the actual subject; not to make a replica but to make an equivalent' (5). Horses Exercising [lot 68] is Blackshaw's ability to capture both arrested movement and contained energy. Any farmer would recognise immediately his capacity to capture the exact stance of a horse, and what the contemporary Irish sculptor Anthony Scott calls 'the line' by which he means the sinuous, overarching outline of the silhouette. Hyperion [lot 70], for example (smaller, reversed, but akin to the artist's Chaser in a Stable, sold by Sotheby's in May 2009) captures perfectly the seized moment: the enquiring but stilled stance of the horse. As with Be My Native [lot 71] the background, in a typical Post-Impressionist trope, can be 'read' either as all-over patterning, or as a recessive landscape. All the previous paintings depict the horse side-on and stilled: they are recognisably portraits of specific horses, but not depicted with a slavish devotion to naturalistic appearances. However, Horses Exercising [lot 68], reminiscent of Yeats perhaps, is a remarkably powerful depiction of movement and energy, seizing on the moment when two horses and their riders are both on the turn. There is a swirling energy to the composition, imparted by the powerful impastoed brushwork, and counterpointed by areas of the canvas which are left blank as in areas of both horses, and also at the bottom edge of the painting. Although seemingly low-keyed in terms of the preponderant greys of the sky, there are beautifully modulated passages of blue, Prussian blue, blue-into-white, rich browns, and also pale ochre-like yellows, the whole 'nailed' to the canvas by a roughly three-inches-by-two patch of reddish-brown at the bottom right. Only the essentials of horse and jockey are limned, and only a painter long familiar with horses could conceivably, and so successfully, take such liberties. As the artist himself once said: 'You must be able to feel if a shape is right or wrong and every shape must have its own identity (6)'. Or as Whistler was wont to remark if upbraided for a seeming simplicity, what you see is the product of a lifetime's experience. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (4) From an unpublished part of an interview with Blackshaw by Brian McAvera, 2002. (5) Ibid. (6) Quotation from Mercy Hunter's Introduction to the Basil Blackshaw Retrospective, ACNI, Belfast 1974. Brian McAvera, October 2017.

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GREY HORSE IN A STABLE
GREY HORSE IN A STABLE
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 69

Published Estimate: €40,000-60,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 34 x 40in. (86.36 x 101.60cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a painter of at least European stature. Blackshaw's English father who was a horse and dog trainer as well as being an amateur watercolourist, moved to Northern Ireland and brought up his large close-knit family in County Down amongst a circle which consisted of farmers, dealers, horsey people, local squires, and even artists. 'I was riding when I was three or four years old and was soon hunting' (4). By the age of ten he was earning pocket money painting the horses of neighbouring farmers and he even funded his art-college stint by doing such work. As an adult he bred both horses and dogs as well as training them. As any countryman will immediately recognise, Blackshaw's paintings of animals are not those of a townie but rather those of a man who has had an intimate, lifelong knowledge of the animal world. Yes, he learnt from Stubbs, and especially from the early Munnings, and yes, he learnt how to strip back a subject to its essence from Giacometti, but he was rarely interested in the detailed articulation of muscle and sinew: 'I want to be divorced a bit from the actual subject; not to make a replica but to make an equivalent' (5). Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], typical of the earlier work and essentially a 'portrait' of a horse, is on the cusp of the painter's shift towards the depiction of animals as icons or emblems. Here, there is a strong sculptural quality, suggesting that the artist had looked closely at Marino Marini and Elizabeth Frink for example. Because of the surrounding paint application, thickly applied in long, horizontal, bristly brushstrokes between the legs of the horse, (there's even a bristle sticking in the paint!), and above its sideways-on silhouette, the horse emerges in low relief. Long, lightly brushed diagonals to the mid left impart energy to the horse's neck while the head, mane and upper body are flecked with impasto to catch the light. As the overall tonality is grey, and although the horse is clearly situated in a none-too-perfect outbuilding which is only notionally indicated, the effect is rather like discovering an image in a prehistoric cave, or on a crumbling Roman fresco. This impression is reinforced by the treatment of the hind legs which shift the white blaze of the lower legs onto hoofs that have all but vanished, as if into a mist. What is common to Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], and also to Be My Native [lot 71], Hyperion [lot 70] and Horses Exercising [lot 68] is Blackshaw's ability to capture both arrested movement and contained energy. Any farmer would recognise immediately his capacity to capture the exact stance of a horse, and what the contemporary Irish sculptor Anthony Scott calls 'the line' by which he means the sinuous, overarching outline of the silhouette. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (2) For example, in Brian Fallon's article 'Evergreen Basil', in Basil Blackshaw, Fenton Gallery, Cork 2005. (3) From Jack Pakenham's Introduction to the book Mourne, Belfast 2005. (4) From an unpublished part of an interview with Blackshaw by Brian McAvera, 2002. (5) Ibid. (6) Quotation from Mercy Hunter's Introduction to the Basil Blackshaw Retrospective, ACNI, Belfast 1974. Brian McAvera, October 2017

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HYPERION
HYPERION
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 70

Published Estimate: €10,000-15,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left; titled lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 10 x 14in. (25.40 x 35.56cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Hyperion (18 April 1930 – 9 December 1960) was a British-bred thoroughbred, a dual classic winner and an outstanding sire. Owned by Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby, Hyperion won GBP £29,509 during his racing career—a considerable sum at the time. His victories included the Epsom Derby and St Leger Stakes. He was the most successful British-bred sire of the 20th century and was champion sire in Great Britain six times between 1940 and 1954. In Search of Basil Blackshaw By Brian McAvera Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a painter of at least European stature. In the current auction, he is represented by two groups of work. One group, from the eighties, depicts horses (almost his trademark), the other, from the late nineties onwards, relate to the artist's collaborations with the poet Paul Yates. The first of these, the four Dunadry mixed-media paintings [lot 72], refer to a Poem-and-Prints limited edition for U.N.I.C.E.F. (See separate note). The others are in the spirit of the works produced for the second collaboration between the poet and the painter, the book Mourne, published by the Tom Caldwell Gallery in 2005. None of these works can be classed as illustration. In some cases, Basil responded to a specific poem, in others the poet responded to Basil's images, but as the painter Jack Pakenham trenchantly noted, they were all 'independent images sparked off in his imagination by the poems' (3). Grey Van [lot 75] for instance is a marvellous work. This is a painting to make you smile. It's the essence of a van, seen with the seemingly artless vision of a child but layered with neo-Expressionist elements from the Germans, from American colour-field painting, and even perhaps from the world of Paddy Graham. No child however could have managed the impeccably organised colour harmonies: those utterly non-representational swathes of orangey-yellow beneath the van; those wheels utterly out of alignment; and those transitions in the sky that magically shift from whitey-pinks on the left, to the deep pinky 'sunset' reds on the right. Or look at Jet [lot 74], the artist's dog, caught economically from a difficult foreshortened point of view, or the remarkable Nude Seated [lot 73] in which a hierarchic nude, squared off in a Francis Bacon-like cage or grid, emerges from a swirling miasma of paint as if about to materialise in Star Trek's teleporter. The figure itself, with its schematics of head, hands and feet, is substantially created out of short, sharp straight lines - a black line for eyebrows and eyes for instance. It's a construction, but a construction in tension with the swirling miasma around it. We are not looking at a portrait: we are looking at an icon. Blackshaw's English father who was a horse and dog trainer as well as being an amateur watercolourist, moved to Northern Ireland and brought up his large close-knit family in County Down amongst a circle which consisted of farmers, dealers, horsey people, local squires, and even artists. 'I was riding when I was three or four years old and was soon hunting' (4). By the age of ten he was earning pocket money painting the horses of neighbouring farmers and he even funded his art-college stint by doing such work. As an adult he bred both horses and dogs as well as training them. As any countryman will immediately recognise, Blackshaw's paintings of animals are not those of a townie but rather those of a man who has had an intimate, lifelong knowledge of the animal world. Yes, he learnt from Stubbs, and especially from the early Munnings, and yes, he learnt how to strip back a subject to its essence from Giacometti, but he was rarely interested in the detailed articulation of muscle and sinew: 'I want to be divorced a bit from the actual subject; not to make a replica but to make an equivalent' (5). Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], typical of the earlier work and essentially a 'portrait' of a horse, is on the cusp of the painter's shift towards the depiction of animals as icons or emblems. Here, there is a strong sculptural quality, suggesting that the artist had looked closely at Marino Marini and Elizabeth Frink for example. Because of the surrounding paint application, thickly applied in long, horizontal, bristly brushstrokes between the legs of the horse, (there's even a bristle sticking in the paint!), and above its sideways-on silhouette, the horse emerges in low relief. Long, lightly brushed diagonals to the mid left impart energy to the horse's neck while the head, mane and upper body are flecked with impasto to catch the light. As the overall tonality is grey, and although the horse is clearly situated in a none-too-perfect outbuilding which is only notionally indicated, the effect is rather like discovering an image in a prehistoric cave, or on a crumbling Roman fresco. This impression is reinforced by the treatment of the hind legs which shift the white blaze of the lower legs onto hoofs that have all but vanished, as if into a mist. What is common to Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], and also to Be My Native [lot 71], Hyperion [lot 70] and Horses Exercising [lot 68] is Blackshaw's ability to capture both arrested movement and contained energy. Any farmer would recognise immediately his capacity to capture the exact stance of a horse, and what the contemporary Irish sculptor Anthony Scott calls 'the line' by which he means the sinuous, overarching outline of the silhouette. Hyperion [lot 70], for example (smaller, reversed, but akin to the artist's Chaser in a Stable, sold by Sotheby's in May 2009) captures perfectly the seized moment: the enquiring but stilled stance of the horse. As with Be My Native [lot 71] the background, in a typical Post-Impressionist trope, can be 'read' either as all-over patterning, or as a recessive landscape. All the previous paintings depict the horse side-on and stilled: they are recognisably portraits of specific horses, but not depicted with a slavish devotion to naturalistic appearances. However, Horses Exercising [lot 68], reminiscent of Yeats perhaps, is a remarkably powerful depiction of movement and energy, seizing on the moment when two horses and their riders are both on the turn. There is a swirling energy to the composition, imparted by the powerful impastoed brushwork, and counterpointed by areas of the canvas which are left blank as in areas of both horses, and also at the bottom edge of the painting. Although seemingly low-keyed in terms of the preponderant greys of the sky, there are beautifully modulated passages of blue, Prussian blue, blue-into-white, rich browns, and also pale ochre-like yellows, the whole 'nailed' to the canvas by a roughly three-inches-by-two patch of reddish-brown at the bottom right. Only the essentials of horse and jockey are limned, and only a painter long familiar with horses could conceivably, and so successfully, take such liberties. As the artist himself once said: 'You must be able to feel if a shape is right or wrong and every shape must have its own identity (6)'. Or as Whistler was wont to remark if upbraided for a seeming simplicity, what you see is the product of a lifetime's experience. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (2) For example, in Brian Fallon's article 'Evergreen Basil', in Basil Blackshaw, Fenton Gallery, Cork 2005. (3) From Jack Pakenham's Introduction to the book Mourne, Belfast 2005. (4) From an unpublished part of an interview with Blackshaw by Brian McAvera, 2002. (5) Ibid. (6) Quotation from Mercy Hunter's Introduction to the Basil Blackshaw Retrospective, ACNI, Belfast 1974.

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BE MY NATIVE
BE MY NATIVE
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 71

Published Estimate: €10,000-15,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right; titled lower left
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 10 x 14in. (25.40 x 35.56cm)
  • Provenance: Purchased directly from the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Be My Native (foaled 16 February 1979) was an American-bred, British-trained thoroughbred racehorse and sire. He recorded his biggest career win as a four-year-old when he won the Coronation Cup. Apart from the aforementioned races he was placed in the Sandown Classic Trial, Dante Stakes, La Coupe de Maisons-Laffitte and Hardwicke Stakes. After his retirement from racing he became a very successful sire of National Hunt horses. Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a painter of at least European stature. Blackshaw's English father who was a horse and dog trainer as well as being an amateur watercolourist, moved to Northern Ireland and brought up his large close-knit family in County Down amongst a circle which consisted of farmers, dealers, horsey people, local squires, and even artists. 'I was riding when I was three or four years old and was soon hunting' (4). By the age of ten he was earning pocket money painting the horses of neighbouring farmers and he even funded his art-college stint by doing such work. As an adult he bred both horses and dogs as well as training them. As any countryman will immediately recognise, Blackshaw's paintings of animals are not those of a townie but rather those of a man who has had an intimate, lifelong knowledge of the animal world. Yes, he learnt from Stubbs, and especially from the early Munnings, and yes, he learnt how to strip back a subject to its essence from Giacometti, but he was rarely interested in the detailed articulation of muscle and sinew: 'I want to be divorced a bit from the actual subject; not to make a replica but to make an equivalent' (5). Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], typical of the earlier work and essentially a 'portrait' of a horse, is on the cusp of the painter's shift towards the depiction of animals as icons or emblems. Here, there is a strong sculptural quality, suggesting that the artist had looked closely at Marino Marini and Elizabeth Frink for example. Because of the surrounding paint application, thickly applied in long, horizontal, bristly brushstrokes between the legs of the horse, (there's even a bristle sticking in the paint!), and above its sideways-on silhouette, the horse emerges in low relief. Long, lightly brushed diagonals to the mid left impart energy to the horse's neck while the head, mane and upper body are flecked with impasto to catch the light. As the overall tonality is grey, and although the horse is clearly situated in a none-too-perfect outbuilding which is only notionally indicated, the effect is rather like discovering an image in a prehistoric cave, or on a crumbling Roman fresco. This impression is reinforced by the treatment of the hind legs which shift the white blaze of the lower legs onto hoofs that have all but vanished, as if into a mist. What is common to Grey Horse in a Stable [lot 69], and also to Be My Native [lot 71], Hyperion [lot 70] and Horses Exercising [lot 68] is Blackshaw's ability to capture both arrested movement and contained energy. Any farmer would recognise immediately his capacity to capture the exact stance of a horse, and what the contemporary Irish sculptor Anthony Scott calls 'the line' by which he means the sinuous, overarching outline of the silhouette. Hyperion [lot 70], for example (smaller, reversed, but akin to the artist's Chaser in a Stable, sold by Sotheby's in May 2009) captures perfectly the seized moment: the enquiring but stilled stance of the horse. As with Be My Native [lot 71] the background, in a typical Post-Impressionist trope, can be 'read' either as all-over patterning, or as a recessive landscape. All the previous paintings depict the horse side-on and stilled: they are recognisably portraits of specific horses, but not depicted with a slavish devotion to naturalistic appearances. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (2) For example, in Brian Fallon's article 'Evergreen Basil', in Basil Blackshaw, Fenton Gallery, Cork 2005. (3) From Jack Pakenham's Introduction to the book Mourne, Belfast 2005. (4) From an unpublished part of an interview with Blackshaw by Brian McAvera, 2002. (5) Ibid. Brian McAvera, October 2017

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DUNADRY BANKS, FOUR VIEWS AFTER THE POEM OF THE SAME NAME BY PAUL YATES
DUNADRY BANKS, FOUR VIEWS AFTER THE POEM OF THE SAME NAME BY PAUL YATES
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 72

Published Estimate: €8,000-10,000

Price Realised: €7500

  • Signature: three signed lower right; one signed lower left
  • Medium: mixed media on paper; (4)
  • Dimensions: 11½ x 11½in. (29.21 x 29.21cm)
  • Provenance: Whyte's, 28 November 2006, lot 29; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The four Dunadry mixed-media paintings [lot 72], refer to a Poem-and-Prints limited edition for U.N.I.C.E.F. None of these works can be classed as illustration. In some cases, Basil responded to a specific poem, in others the poet responded to Basil's images, but as the painter Jack Pakenham trenchantly noted, they were all 'independent images sparked off in his imagination by the poems' Brian McAvera, October 2017 Painted in response to the poem, Dunadry Banks, by Paul Yates, this was the first in a series of artistic collaborations between Blackshaw and Yates. The poem and images relate to a particular stretch of the Six Mile Water area at Dunadry, Co. Antrim. Blackshaw spent a formative period in his life there and would walk by the river several times daily with a canine companion. While Yates’ poem portrays the area by moonlight, Blackshaw chose to respond with images drawn from memories of summer days spent along the river. Most recently the pair worked together on Mourne, published by the Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast, with poems by Yates and images by Blackshaw. Jack Pakenham, in his introduction to Mourne, remarked: “Paul and Basil are true ‘eccentrics’, that is in the literal sense to be found in the original Greek word ek kentros meaning literally ‘out of centre’ or ‘beyond the centre’, the Greeks believing that the vast majority of people interpreted reality from a central core but that original thinkers saw the world from the circumference and therefore offered quite different perspectives. Paul and Basil have struck up a friendship and professional collaboration based upon each having a unique way of seeing and portraying things and recognising in each other ‘fellow souls’”. In 1994 a series of smaller sized lithographs of the Dunadry Banks images were made. The effects of a burst water tank where the lithographs were being stored resulted in very few sets remaining in existence. These sets of prints will soon be available for sale exclusively through Brown Thomas, Dublin. Dunadry Banks by Paul Yates The river is a lady in evening dress strip teasing in the moonlight, Slipping off shoals of silver fox shadow gloves and silk sounding Stockings with toes as pointed as eels, trailing a wake of slinking Pine marten stoll in long hushed curves, slipping past you sleek As a limousine, its twisting and turning lingering like French perfume. The river is landing strip for the ghosts of hoar frosted moon hounds Knifing the gun metal cold water to hunt down love note paper Boats torn from the pages of Gray’s Anatomy, to sniff out nude shaped Stowaways and the helter - skelter descents of ripple mimicking Leaves inspired by Leonardo’s designs for future flying machines. The river is informer revealing the secret weddings of clouds in the Night, reporting the trombone lunged small talk of distant covens Of stay out cattle, embellishing the taffeta wrestled whispers of angels Casting their wings in the tree tops, signing in tongues of liquid silver And gold the child’s play and opera of their laughter. The river is glass bottomed heavens stream of consciousness of past And present equi – distant from eternity; Zen Of a man walking a dog and dowsing through its leash the pull Of infinity walking through the walls of the banks, an un-beginning Unending quietening running true to itself all the way. Paul Yates, November 2006.

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NUDE SEATED
NUDE SEATED
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 73

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €2500

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 18¾ x 13¼in. (47.63 x 33.66cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • With a letter of provenance from Paul Yates, publishing collaborator of Basil Blackshaw. Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a painter of at least European stature. The remarkable Nude Seated [lot 73] depicts a hierarchic nude, squared off in a Francis Bacon-like cage or grid, emerging from a swirling miasma of paint as if about to materialise in Star Trek's teleporter. The figure itself, with its schematics of head, hands and feet, is substantially created out of short, sharp straight lines - a black line for eyebrows and eyes for instance. It's a construction, but a construction in tension with the swirling miasma around it. We are not looking at a portrait: we are looking at an icon. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (2) For example, in Brian Fallon's article 'Evergreen Basil', in Basil Blackshaw, Fenton Gallery, Cork 2005. Brian McAvera, October 2017

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JET
JET
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 74

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €2400

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil and charcoal on canvas mounted on board
  • Dimensions: 15½ x 9½in. (39.37 x 24.13cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • With a letter of provenance from Paul Yates, publishing collaborator of Basil Blackshaw. In Search of Basil Blackshaw By Brian McAvera Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a painter of at least European stature. Here, Jet, the artist's dog, is caught economically from a difficult foreshortened point of view. Brian McAvera, October 2017

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GREY VAN
GREY VAN
Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 75

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €3400

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 11 x 15¼in. (27.94 x 38.74cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • With a letter of provenance from Paul Yates, publishing collaborator of Basil Blackshaw. Though the description 'an anecdotal painter of country life' could be applied to a goodly proportion of 19th and 20th century Irish painters, it emphatically does not pertain to Basil Blackshaw (1932-2016) even though Basil, never a man for city life, ensconced himself in deepest countryside for most of his life, and even though his depicted world was populated by dogs, horses, cocks, 'doggie men', and farmers, as well as the Northern Irish landscape. As John Hewitt acutely observed, right at the start of the artist's career, this was a man who, although a representative painter, only used as much description as he deemed necessary, being more concerned with developing 'a relationship of shapes, colours, and lines which should be complete and satisfying in itself'(1). This dialogue between representation and abstraction continued for the rest of his life. Often, and rightly, regarded as one of the major Irish painters (2), Blackshaw can easily be seen as being in that lineage which stretches from Paul Henry, William Conor, Keating and O'Neill through to himself, but this is a limited and limiting view of the man. Although he may seem the most 'Irish' of painters his subject matter has always been subject to a crucible of influences: the English school from Stubbs through to Alan Reynolds; the School of Paris, and in particular De Stael, Buffett and Giacometti; the early twentieth century expressionists from Die Brücke to Kokoschka; the European and especially the German Neo Expressionists such as Baselitz; and finally American colour-field painting in the shape of Maurice Louis, Frankenthaler and company. Basil's gift for assimilation, his ability to 'remain his own man' in the slipstream of such influences, marks him out as a In the current auction, he is represented by two groups of work. One group, from the eighties, depicts horses (almost his trademark), the other, from the late nineties onwards, relate to the artist's collaborations with the poet Paul Yates. The first of these, the four Dunadry mixed-media paintings [lot 72], refer to a Poem-and-Prints limited edition for U.N.I.C.E.F. (See separate note). The others are in the spirit of the works produced for the second collaboration between the poet and the painter, the book Mourne, published by the Tom Caldwell Gallery in 2005. None of these works can be classed as illustration. In some cases, Basil responded to a specific poem, in others the poet responded to Basil's images, but as the painter Jack Pakenham trenchantly noted, they were all 'independent images sparked off in his imagination by the poems' (3). The present work, Grey Van, for instance is a marvellous work. This is a painting to make you smile. It's the essence of a van, seen with the seemingly artless vision of a child but layered with neo-Expressionist elements from the Germans, from American colour-field painting, and even perhaps from the world of Paddy Graham. No child however could have managed the impeccably organised colour harmonies: those utterly non-representational swathes of orangey-yellow beneath the van; those wheels utterly out of alignment; and those transitions in the sky that magically shift from whitey-pinks on the left, to the deep pinky 'sunset' reds on the right. (1) Written for the first issue of the magazine Threshold, Belfast 1957. (2) For example, in Brian Fallon's article 'Evergreen Basil', in Basil Blackshaw, Fenton Gallery, Cork 2005. (3) From Jack Pakenham's Introduction to the book Mourne, Belfast 2005. (4) From an unpublished part of an interview with Blackshaw by Brian McAvera, 2002.

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THREE MUSICIANS
THREE MUSICIANS
John B. Vallely (b.1941)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 76

Published Estimate: €6,000-8,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right; titled on Tom Caldwell Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 30 x 40in. (76.20 x 101.60cm)
  • Provenance: Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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THE ISLAND, 1967
THE ISLAND, 1967
Barrie Cooke HRHA (1931-2014)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 77

Published Estimate: €3,000-4,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed, titled, dated and with dedication on reverse
  • Medium: oil on panel
  • Dimensions: 27½ x 18¾in. (69.85 x 47.63cm)
  • Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by present owner's father; Thence by family descent
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • This work depicts hop plants and was painted by Barrie Cooke for the vendor's father who was a hop farmer.

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LOUGH ROSS (CABBAGES), 1982
LOUGH ROSS (CABBAGES), 1982
Barrie Cooke HRHA (1931-2014)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 78

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right; inscribed on David Hendriks label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 28 x 28in. (71.12 x 71.12cm)
  • Provenance: David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin; Where purchased by the present owner's father; Thence by family descent
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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THREE SHADOWS
THREE SHADOWS
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 79

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1400

  • Signature: signed with initials lower right; inscribed [P/P] lower left
  • Medium: carborundum with relief; (printer's proof)
  • Dimensions: 67 x 27½in. (170.18 x 69.85cm)
  • Provenance: Adam's, 21 September 2005, lot 110; Collection of Judge Desmond Windle
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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UNTITLED [YELLOW AND GREEN], 1972
UNTITLED [YELLOW AND GREEN], 1972
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 80

Published Estimate: €800-1,200

Price Realised: €1600


IRISH PLACE, 1963
IRISH PLACE, 1963
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 81

Published Estimate: €3,500-4,500

Price Realised: €3400

  • Signature: signed with initials and dated lower centre; with artist's archival number [2024] on reverse
  • Medium: oil and mixed media on card
  • Dimensions: 16 x 25½in. (40.64 x 64.77cm)
  • Provenance: Butler Gallery, Kilkenny; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature: 'O'Malley - Work from the Sixties', Butler Gallery, Kilkenny, 1992, catalogue no. 45 (illustrated in catalogue; unpaginated)
  • Accompanied by the Butler Gallery exhibition catalogue, signed and dated [17 June 1992] by the artist. Brian Fallon expertly describes and praises the "sheer power and originality" of O'Malley's work from the 1960s in his introduction to the Butler Gallery catalogue which explored and celebrated this important period in the artist's career. O'Malley was living in Cornwall from 1960 but the title of this work would suggest - as Fallon discusses - a "..nostalgia and the inevitable consciousness of being to some extent an exile…"

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THE POND, PHYSICIANSTOWN, KILKENNY, 1992
THE POND, PHYSICIANSTOWN, KILKENNY, 1992
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 82

Published Estimate: €5,000-7,000

Price Realised: €7000

  • Signature: signed with initials lower left and lower right; also dated lower right; signed in full in Irish, titled, dated [20/10/92] and with artist's archival number [2679] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 12 x 24in. (30.48 x 60.96cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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OLD FIELD, CARBINE BRIDGE, CALLAN, COUNTY KILKENNY, 1979
OLD FIELD, CARBINE BRIDGE, CALLAN, COUNTY KILKENNY, 1979
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 83

Published Estimate: €8,000-12,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed, titled, dated and numbered on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 36¼ x 47½in. (92.08 x 120.65cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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THE THREE HENS, 1971
THE THREE HENS, 1971
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 84

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €2200

  • Signature: signed lower left and dated lower right
  • Medium: oil on canvas board
  • Dimensions: 12 x 15¼in. (30.48 x 38.74cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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OCTOBER AND BLACK, 1983
OCTOBER AND BLACK, 1983
Tony O'Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 85

Published Estimate: €3,000-5,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: with artist's initials in the weave lower left; titled on reverse
  • Medium: Gobelin style woven tapestry
  • Dimensions: 57 x 35in. (144.78 x 88.90cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Around 1983 George McClelland approached Wexford weaver Terry Dunne to create five unique tapestries based on original artworks by Tony O'Malley from his collection. According to Dunne, these tapestries were originally intended for inclusion in the artist's Arts Council Retrospective in 1984 however this idea was never realised. Instead the artworks remained in the McClelland private collection. We are grateful to Terry Dunne for his kind assistance in cataloguing this work. Dunne continues his successful practice in County Wexford and has since produced commissioned pieces for O'Malley's wife Jane, Michael Smurfit & The K Club, Co. Kildare, Monaghan Cathedral, Dublin City University, Irish Life Beresford Place, Dublin and Green Isle Foods among others. For further reading see: www.terrytheweaver.ie

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HERCULES AND ANTAEUS NO. II, 1985
HERCULES AND ANTAEUS NO. II, 1985
Felim Egan (b.1952)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 86

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €3900

  • Signature: signed, titled and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 55¼ x 63in. (140.34 x 160.02cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • In 1979 Felim Egan won a Rome Scholarship to live and study in the eternal city. In Italy he met artists like Clemente and Chia. Around that time Achille Bonito Oliva was proselytising the trans-avant-garde. Figurative painting had also made a return and what appeared to be the self-indulgent and non-referential nature of abstract art was called into question. A year or so after returning from Rome Egan developed an interest in the mythology of the Romans and the Greeks and how it had influenced Italian art. At this point the figurative element in his work was beginning to emerge. In 1984 he exhibited a series of large scale paintings at The Third Eye Centre in Glasgow where he drew outlines of figures borrowed from Michelangelo and Donatello and applied his particular logic to them. He has said: 'I was trying to deal with polarization and tensions within the paintings, no longer in an abstract way but by bringing in, overlaying it with the intellectual level of mythology.' These new works included some laconic female nudes but mostly male figures struggling, wrestling or contemplating action. Among these new works, he completed a set of paintings on the theme of Hercules and Antaeus. The genius of Egan's art is the act of placement. Many of these works involved the siting of a gestural splash, attempting to accommodate a particular violence but also displacement, disorientation as well as the nature of rootedness. One knew Egan's ability with line and subdued colour relationships but now he declared his skill at orchestrating elements of diverse cultural/visual languages - classical, oriental, twentieth century constructivism and pop art - into meaningful and potent compositions. Hercules and Antaeus No. II belongs to this period shift in his work. Professor Liam Kelly October 2017

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UN ARTISTE PEINTRE, 1978
UN ARTISTE PEINTRE, 1978
Micheal Farrell (1940-2000)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 87

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right; titled lower left
  • Medium: pencil, gouache and watercolour
  • Dimensions: 22¼ x 30in. (56.52 x 76.20cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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HAY FEVER
HAY FEVER
Barry Castle (1935-2006)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 88

Published Estimate: €800-1,200

Price Realised: €750


NUNS MISS THE MOON
NUNS MISS THE MOON
Barry Castle (1935-2006)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 89

Published Estimate: €1,200-1,500

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: with title inscribed on label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 30 x 18in. (76.20 x 45.72cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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TREE PEOPLE, 1972
TREE PEOPLE, 1972
Pauline Bewick RHA (b.1935)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 90

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €2500

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right; with Dawson Gallery framing label on reverse
  • Medium: watercolour, pen and ink on paper
  • Dimensions: 40 x 27½in. (101.60 x 69.85cm)
  • Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin; Beaufield Mews Gallery, Stillorgan; Private collection; Whyte's, 21 February 2006, lot 162; Whence purchased by the present owner
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Presented in original Dawson Gallery frame.

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JUDGE DESMOND WINDLE, 1995
JUDGE DESMOND WINDLE, 1995
Michael Kane (b.1935)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 91

Published Estimate: €800-1,200

Price Realised: €950

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right
  • Medium: gouache
  • Dimensions: 30½ x 43½in. (77.47 x 110.49cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Judge Desmond Windle
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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THEATRICAL PEOPLE
THEATRICAL PEOPLE
David Crone RHA (b.1937)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 92

Published Estimate: €800-1,200

Price Realised: €1300

  • Signature: signed, titled and with artist's address on reverse; also with Tom Caldwell Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 40 x 49½in. (101.60 x 125.73cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Judge Desmond Windle
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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MOMENTUM, 2005
MOMENTUM, 2005
Charles Harper RHA (b.1943)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 93

Published Estimate: €4,000-6,000

Price Realised: €6600

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right; signed, titled and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 72 x 48in. (182.88 x 121.92cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • A major exhibition of Harper's work will be shown at the RHA, Dublin in March and April 2018.

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FATHER CONMEE, ULYSSES, EPISODE TEN, 1995
FATHER CONMEE, ULYSSES, EPISODE TEN, 1995
John Behan RHA (b.1938)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 94

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €950


ROSEHIP AND SKULL, 1998
ROSEHIP AND SKULL, 1998
Nick Miller (b.1962)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 95

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €1500

  • Signature: signed lower left; dated lower right; signed, titled and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 13½ x 17½in. (34.29 x 44.45cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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URBAN IV
URBAN IV
Gwen O'Dowd (b.1957)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 96

Published Estimate: €2,000-3,000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: inscribed on reverse
  • Medium: gouache on paper
  • Dimensions: 42½ x 40in. (107.95 x 101.60cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of Judge Desmond Windle
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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PORTRAIT OF A.B., 1970
PORTRAIT OF A.B., 1970
Brian Bourke HRHA (b.1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 97

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €1700

  • Signature: signed and inscribed with title and date on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 24 x 19in. (60.96 x 48.26cm)
  • Provenance: Collection of George and Maura McClelland
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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DAY OF THE DEAD, MEXICO, 1993-1994
DAY OF THE DEAD, MEXICO, 1993-1994
Michael Cullen RHA (b.1946)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 98

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €1400


BAR, SLIGO / MEXICO [CONNOLLY'S] 2005
BAR, SLIGO / MEXICO [CONNOLLY'S] 2005
Philip Kelly (1950-2010)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 99

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €2100

  • Signature: signed, titled and dated on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 19¾ x 23¾in. (50.17 x 60.33cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • "Colourful, exuberant painter with a passion for Mexico" is how Phil Kelly was described in his obituary in the Irish Times on 7 August 2010 while The Guardian noted, "an extraordinary and gifted painter… [whose work] captured the imagination of collectors and supporters worldwide, including the poet Seamus Heaney, for whose wife, Marie, he completed a set of book illustrations, and the chef Rick Stein, for whose Seafood Restaurant in Padstow, Cornwall, Phil created a mural." Although raised in Ireland and England, Kelly lived in Mexico City from 1989 and became a Mexican citizen in 1999. Three years previously an exhibition entitled Babel Descifrada, devoted to the work of Kelly, was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico. Later in Ireland, in 1997, the Frederick Gallery hosted an exhibition of his work, followed by a show at Hillsboro Fine Art in Dublin. According to the Times, "…in the 1990s, Kelly played the role of Ireland's unofficial cultural attaché in Mexico. The then Mexican ambassador to Ireland, Daniel Dultzin, routinely suggested that Irish visitors call on him. A formidable number did and enjoyed the experience. They included President Mary McAleese during her first term, Seamus Heaney, Síle de Valera, Robert Ballagh, broadcaster Rodney Rice, painter Philippa Bayliss and many more."

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MYCENEAN GOLD MASK, 1974
MYCENEAN GOLD MASK, 1974
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 100

Published Estimate: €1,200-1,500

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: dedicated and signed in pencil in the margin lower left
  • Medium: Intaglio print on paper; (from an edition of 75)
  • Dimensions: 15½ x 15½in. (39.37 x 39.37cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The present lot pertains to the artist's first collaboration with the Maeght workshops in France: Seven Aquatints, published by Maeght Editeur, Paris, including Image in Darkness, Mycenean Gold Mask, Image Forming on a Red Background, Lemon, on Arches paper, 66 by 50.5 cm, printed in an edition of 75 by Atelier Maeght, St. Paul, France. For another example of work from this series see lots 101 and 104.

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LEMON, 1974
LEMON, 1974
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 101

Published Estimate: €1,200-1,500

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed, dated [20.2.1974] and dedicated ["with gratitude and admiration"] in pencil in the margin lower left
  • Medium: Intaglio print on paper; (from an edition of 75)
  • Dimensions: 15½ x 15½in. (39.37 x 39.37cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The present lot pertains to the artist's first collaboration with the Maeght workshops in France: Seven Aquatints, published by Maeght Editeur, Paris, including Image in Darkness, Mycenean Gold Mask, Image Forming on a Red Background, Lemon, on Arches paper, 66 by 50.5 cm, printed in an edition of 75 by Atelier Maeght, St. Paul, France. For another example of work from this series see lots 100 and 104.

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THE TÁIN. NAKED WOMAN, 1969
THE TÁIN. NAKED WOMAN, 1969
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 102

Published Estimate: €1,500-2,000

Price Realised: €2400

  • Signature: signed, numbered and dated lower right
  • Medium: lithographic brush drawing; (no. 53 from an edition of 70)
  • Dimensions: 21¼ x 15in. (53.98 x 38.10cm)
  • Provenance: Whyte's, 30 April 2007, ex lot 52; Private collection
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • Printed in Dublin in 1969 by Frank O’Reilly in an edition of 70 plus one artist’s proof. The present example is no. 14 in the series.

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DUBLINERS, BALLAST OFFICE CLOCK, 1986
DUBLINERS, BALLAST OFFICE CLOCK, 1986
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 103

Published Estimate: €1,000-1,500

Price Realised: €950

  • Signature: signed, dated and numbered lower right
  • Medium: lithograph on handmade Japanese paper; (no. 11 from an edition of 35)
  • Dimensions: 18 x 12½in. (45.72 x 31¾cm)
  • Provenance: Family of the artist
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
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NO LEMON, 1974
NO LEMON, 1974
Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 27 November 2017 / 104

Published Estimate: €1,200-1,500

Price Realised: €1150

  • Signature: signed and with dedication in pencil in the margin lower centre
  • Medium: Intaglio print on paper; (from an edition of 75)
  • Dimensions: 6 x 6¾in. (15.24 x 17.15cm)
  • Provenance
  • Exhibited
  • Literature
  • The present print pertains to the artist's first collaboration with the Maeght workshops in France: Seven Aquatints, published by Maeght Editeur, Paris, including Image in Darkness, Mycenean Gold Mask, Image Forming on a Red Background, Lemon, on Arches paper, 66 by 50.5 cm, printed in an edition of 75 by Atelier Maeght, St. Paul, France. For two other examples from this series see lots 100 & 101.

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